Breaking News

MONKEY POX: IMPORTANT THINGS YOU MUST KNOW AND HOW TO PREVENT IT TODAY

MONKEY POX: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW AND HOW TO PREVENT IT:

monkey pox and what you should know anout it



Monkeypox is real, please don't be deceived that it isn't, please inform others and please be careful, where you go, who you touch, what you eat, where you eat, etc please be warned, once you notice you are not feeling too good or you start noticing the symptoms, please visit the nearest medical clinic and please remember to tell them it is the symptom of monkey pox. PLEASE SAVE A LIFE TODAY BY SHARING.

WHAT IS MONKEY POX:

Monkeypox is a rare viral zoonosis (a virus transmitted to humans from animals) with symptoms in humans similar to those seen in the past in smallpox patients, although less severe. Smallpox was eradicated in 1980.However, monkeypox still occurs sporadically in some parts of Africa

ACCORDING TO WHO:

Monkeypox is a rare disease that occurs primarily in remote parts of Central and West Africa, near tropical rain forests.

The monkeypox virus can cause a fatal illness in humans and, although it is similar to human smallpox which has been eradicated, it is much milder.

The monkeypox virus is transmitted to people from various wild animals but has limited secondary spread through human-to-human transmission.

Typically, case fatality in monkeypox outbreaks has been between 1% and 10%, with most deaths occurring in younger age groups.

There is no treatment or vaccine available although prior smallpox vaccination was highly effective in preventing monkeypox as well.

Signs and symptoms:

The incubation period (interval from infection to onset of symptoms) of monkeypox is usually from 6 to 16 days but can range from 5 to 21 days.

The infection can be divided into two periods:

the invasion period (0-5 days) characterized by fever, intense headache, lymphadenopathy (swelling of the lymph node), back pain, myalgia (muscle ache) and an intense asthenia (lack of energy);
monkey pox and what you should know about itthe skin eruption period (within 1-3 days after appearance of fever) where the various stages of the rash appears, often beginning on the face and then spreading elsewhere on the body. The face (in 95% of cases), and palms of the hands and soles of the feet (75%) are most affected. Evolution of the rash from maculopapules (lesions with a flat bases) to vesicles (small fluid-filled blisters), pustules, followed by crusts occurs in approximately 10 days. Three weeks might be necessary before the complete disappearance of the crusts.
The number of the lesions varies from a few to several thousand, affecting oral mucous membranes (in 70% of cases), genitalia (30%), and conjunctivae (eyelid) (20%), as well as the cornea (eyeball).

Some patients develop severe lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes) before the appearance of the rash, which is a distinctive feature of monkeypox compared to other similar diseases.

Monkeypox is usually a self-limited disease with the symptoms lasting from 14 to 21 days. Severe cases occur more commonly among children and are related to the extent of virus exposure, patient health status and severity of complications.

People living in or near the forested areas may have indirect or low-level exposure to infected animals, possibly leading to subclinical (asymptomatic) infection.

The case fatality has varied widely between epidemics but has been less than 10% in documented events, mostly among young children. In general, younger age-groups appear to be more susceptible to monkeypox.

The first case was reported on September 22 in Bayelsa, and according to the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), 31 suspected cases have been reported across seven states including Rivers, Akwa Ibom, Ekiti, Lagos, Ogun and Cross River. 

THE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW:

monkey pox in lagos and  things you need to know


The first human case of monkeypox was recorded in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of Congo during a period of intensified effort to eliminate smallpox.

The disease was first identified in 1958 by the State Serum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, during an investigation into a pox-like disease among monkeys

 Monkeypox occurs sporadically in some remote parts of central and West Africa. It was first discovered in monkeys hence the name, monkeypox.

Secondary, or human-to-human, transmission can result from close contact with infected respiratory tract secretions, skin lesions of an infected person or objects recently contaminated by patient fluids or lesion materials.

 The symptoms of monkeypox are similar to but milder than the symptoms of smallpox. Monkeypox begins with fever, headache, muscle aches, chills, and exhaustion. The main difference between symptoms of smallpox and monkeypox is that monkeypox causes lymph nodes to swell while smallpox does not. The incubation period (time from infection to symptoms) for monkeypox is usually 7-14 days but can range from 5−21 days. Within the first three days or more, after the appearance of fever, the patient develops a rash, often beginning on the face then spreading to other parts of the body.

The infection can be contracted from direct contact with the blood, bodily fluids, or cutaneous or mucosal lesions of infected animals like monkeys, Gambian giant rats, squirrels, and rodents. Eating inadequately cooked meat of infected animals is a possible risk factor.

Monkeypox can be transmitted from human to human through physical touch, contact with stool, blood contact. Avoid contact with animals that could harbour the virus (including animals that are sick or that have been found dead in areas where monkeypox occurs). 

HOW TO PREVENT IT:


Vaccination against smallpox has been proven to be 85% effective in preventing monkeypox in the past but the vaccine is no longer available to the public after it was discontinued following global smallpox eradication in 1980.

 Practice good hand hygiene with or without contact with infected animals or humans. Wash your hands regularly with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.

Avoid contact with any materials, such as bedding, that has been in contact with a sick animal or person. Isolate infected patients from others who could be at risk for infection.

 Monkeypox has been shown to cause death in about as 10 percent of those who contract the disease. Children are more susceptible to the infection.


PLEASE SAVE A LIFE TODAY BY SHARING.



1 comment:

  1. What's up, I log on to your blog regularly. Your writing style
    is awesome, keep it up!

    ReplyDelete

PLEASE SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS WITH US. THANK YOU